A friend of mine knew I had been working on my family history and bought me an AncestryDNA kit for my birthday. My results were surprising to say the least. I discovered I’m 35% Native American, 5% African and 29% from the Iberian Peninsula. This has drastically broadened the way I think about my identity and heritage. I feel connected to those parts of the world now and I’m excited to see how far back our records can go.
DNA Diagnostics Centre offers a range of exciting ancestry testing services. Whether you’re looking to discover the origins of the maternal or paternal side of your family or you wish to determine your genetic profile and learn how much ancestral DNA you have from European, African, indigenous American or Asian peoples, we have the right test for you.

AncestryDNA, 23andMe, HomeDNA, Living DNA, and MyHeritage DNA all provide reports of your ethnicity, some showing maps of where your ancestors lived along with information about the particular countries and regions. National Geographic goes further back, pinpointing where in Africa your ancestors came from and tracing migration patterns through to near-present times. It's less about your personal genetic makeup and more about who your ancestors were and how you're connected to the beginning of civilization.


Newman says that there’s a basic lack of “literacy” and understanding about genetic testing, among the public and even other health professionals. People are given false reassurances or made to panic (just because you have certain genetic variants, it doesn’t mean that you will develop a particular condition). Newman also makes the point that, in his field, counselling happens before and after testing and, while people with cancer or heart issues nearly always opt to have the test (as they can then take action to varying degrees), often people with conditions such as Huntington’s disease in their family decide not to go ahead because a diagnosis would change nothing for them. In any event, Newman says that, with genetic testing, while there are different levels, intensive counselling is always “absolutely key”.
This is a large amount of data not being used by services testing DNA. There are millions of SNP’s contained in your DNA. This type of testing only looks at specific variations. This requires between 100 and 300 AIM’s. This is a small fraction of the SNP’s differentiating DNA. This means if your test stated you are fifty percent European, it means only half of your SNP’s appear to be European. Another issue is certain markers used for ancestry information for any given test are only derived from either your Y chromosomes or your paternal line or your mitochondrial DNA or maternal line. When these markers are used, your test will be less accurate. Another flaw is the DNA testing services are obtaining DNA from the current populations in specific regions. This makes unsubstantiated conclusions that the people living in these areas hundreds of thousands of years in the past have had the same DNA for all these years.
For better ancestry and medical insights, you should encourage family members, especially parents and grandparents, to take a DNA test as well. If your family is from a specific geographical location for generations, your samples could potentially improve the service's reference panel, in turn improving results for everyone. If you’re female and take a test from 23andMe or LivingDNA, you can view paternal haplogroup information, and you get more information when one of your male family members takes a test as well.
So I get my DNA result and it has even less information than what my address can tell about me. They say they don't have have much information on the area am from. But that's not something they tell you when you buy. Furthermore half the information is incorrect. Called customer services and the answer is - Sorry you feel that way, nothing we can do. DO NOT SPEND YOUR MONEY HERE. MIGHT AS WELL BURN IT!!!
Another key customer type could be people like myself, hurtling through middle age, perhaps just starting to feel the cold bony hand of mortality clamp down on their shoulder. People, who, in the past, may not have exactly prioritised their health, who are starting to wonder what may be in store for them and who are in the (“Hypochondriacs R Us”) market for some hard-core insight and advice.
×