I was interested in the ethnicity test provided by African Ancestry because of their claim to be able to place your ancestry in a current African country or region. However after reading multiple reviews, I'm hesitant to spend $300 to find out my ancestors are "West African" or from Sub Sahara Africa. Is there any company whose test can place Ancestry within a specific region of African?
People with hereditary hemochromatosis are typically monitored for symptoms or complications. Iron overload related to hereditary hemochromatosis is a treatable condition. In some patients, having blood drawn on a regular basis can help lower iron levels. People with iron overload are encouraged to avoid drinking alcohol to minimize liver damage and to limit intake of iron-rich food.
It’s worth bearing in mind that when you’re presented with the population groups that have contributed to your DNA, some of the groups revealed may be very general (e.g. Western European) and the report may not tell you when or for how long each group was located in the region that it’s named after. The specificity of the population groups depends on the reference populations used by the company you test with (discussed later). Therefore, if a detailed ethnic breakdown is important to you, look for example reports from the company you’re considering, or get in touch with them to ask for a list of the reference populations that they use.

Both men and women can take mitochondrial DNA tests (because we all possess mitochondria in our cells), but it’s worth noting that women are unable to take Y DNA tests as they do not possess a Y chromosome. If you’re female and you’d like to learn more about your paternal lineage, you can ask a close male relative to take a Y DNA test on your behalf – read our article about Y DNA testing for more information.
And a final note: be on the alert for surprises in your DNA – sometimes its as simple as realising that what you thought was a surname that had come down through the male line, has actually been taken from a female at some point who kept her maiden name (which means the DNA signature will match the surname of the father of her children, and not the surname the child was given). Sometimes the man who is believed to be the father just isn’t – and that will show by his real sons having a different DNA signature to the ones fathered by another man. Often these NPE’s (non-paternal events) will be many generations back, but they could be much closer.

When we speak, co-founder Hamish Grierson describes Thriva as “a lifestyle brand with medical-grade testing at the back end”, an opportunity for “people to see themselves as consumers rather than patients”. Grierson gives examples of people who have benefited from Thriva testing, sometimes picking up early on serious issues. As for alarming people, Grierson says that Thriva has on-site facilities to discuss results and is intended to be “complementary to the NHS” rather than replacing it: “If there are questions we can’t answer, we’re very clear that people should pick it up with their GP.”
In order to truly understand what a DNA estimate is, we have to get a little bit scientific.  The DNA testing companies use something called “sample populations” in order to give you your ethnicity estimate.  Their laboratories compare your DNA with that of thousands of people from all over the world.  In order to become a part of the same population, the participants would have needed to prove that they and their ancestors have lived in the same geographic area for several generations.  Their DNA is then grouped by geographic area.
TTR-related hereditary amyloidosis is a genetic condition caused by the buildup of a protein called transthyretin (TTR) in the body's tissues and organs. This protein buildup, called amyloidosis, can damage the nerves, the heart, and other parts of the body. This test includes three of the most common genetic variants linked to TTR-related hereditary amyloidosis.
At-home paternity tests have been around much longer than other direct-to-consumer DNA tests. Most of them require you to collect cheek swab samples from a prospective father and child, which you then send off to a lab to determine paternity. For non-legal use, these tests can cost as little as $15, but tests that provide verified results that are admissible in court cost a few hundred dollars. 
Although reference populations are the primary method by which companies calculate your ethnic mix, they don’t represent actual living populations. Instead, they’re a theoretical group who share a unique set of genetic variants, believed to belong to a distinct ethnic group in the past. This is why an ethnicity DNA test will show you that you’re a mix of different ethnicities, instead of placing you in a single ethnic group.

Three of the companies, MyHeritage, Ancestry and FTDNA, use the Illumina OmniExpress chip and 23andMe uses the new Infinium® Global Screening Array chip from Illumina. The fact that all of the chips come from the same company may be confusing, leading some to believe that all tests are created equal. This is not the case. The chip used to process DNA samples is only one part of the process. Each company develops their own analysis of the results, references different population samples and provides different reports. In addition, each one of these DNA test providers offers different tools for you to analyze the data you receive, creating variations in results, accessibility and usefulness.
The little changes are where “mutations” occur over generations – these aren’t necessarily bad, it just means that the gene has been copied slightly differently as it passed from father to son. Because its possible to predict how often mutations are likely to occur, comparing the Y-DNA from distant male cousins with a common ancestor (and seeing how many differences there are in a standardised set of markers tested) allows a rough estimate of when that common ancestor might have lived. A very close match between two men who share a common surname (only one or two differences) makes it very likely they are related, and a bigger number of differences makes it either less likely they are related, or that the most recent common ancestor is very many generations back.
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